News

Prof. Bayen points to traffic congestion that has been smoothed by CIRCLES vehicles on an I-24 MOTION testbed monitor.

Alexandre Bayen leads massive AI traffic experiment

An interdisciplinary team of industry and academic researchers led by EECS Prof. Alexandre Bayen has completed its most ambitious real-time traffic experiment to date. The project was led by the CIRCLES Consortium, an effort led by UC Berkeley and Vanderbilt University, involving collaborators from five universities and multiple government agencies. The experiment tested 100 partially automated vehicles in real traffic with the aim of improving overall traffic flow. Operating out of a massive control center designed to monitor one section of I-14 in Nashville, TN, the researchers used AI to build on existing adaptive cruise control systems to smooth phantom jams collaboratively. Their results show a positive energy impact. “Driving is very intuitive. If there’s a gap in front of you, you accelerate. If someone brakes, you slow down. But it turns out that this very normal reaction can lead to stop-and-go traffic and energy inefficiency,” said Prof. Bayen. “That’s precisely what AI technology is able to fix—it can direct the vehicle to things that are not intuitive to humans, but are overall more efficient.” 

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Dawn Song and David Wagner win ACM CCS Test-of-Time Award

CS Profs. Dawn Song and David Wagner have won the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Special Interest Group on Security, Audit and Control (SIGSAC) Test-of-Time Award. The 2011 paper titled, “Android Permissions Demystified,” by Felt, Chin, Hanna, Song and Wagner, was the first paper to examine real-world security issues in Android applications' use of permissions. The paper has been cited 1985 times and is still taught in graduate courses today. The award was presented at the ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS), the flagship conference of the ACM SIGSAC, which took place in Los Angeles this year.

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Fred Zhang wins Best Student Paper at SODA 2023

Theory Ph.D. student Fred Zhang (advisor: Jelani Nelson) has won the Best Student Paper Award at ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms (SODA) 2023. The paper titled, “Online Prediction in Sub-linear Space'' was co-authored by Binghui Peng of Columbia University. The ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms, or “SODA,” conference showcases “research topics related to design and analysis of efficient algorithms and data structures for discrete problems.” 

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Prabal Dutta wins 2022 ACM SenSys Test of Time Award

EECS Associate Prof. Prabal Dutta has won the 2022 ACM SenSys Test of Time Award. The paper by Dutta, Dawson-Haggerty (Ph.D. ‘14), Chen, Liang, and Terzis titled, “Design and Evaluation of a Versatile and Efficient Receiver-Initiated Link Layer for Low-Power Wireless,”  was recognized “for pioneering the use of synchronous transmissions in low-power protocols by exploiting their benefits at the MAC layer and pushing the limits of radio operation.” Established in 2014, the “ToTA” recognizes papers that are at least 10 years old and have demonstrated long-lasting impact on network embedded sensing system science and engineering. “It's a real testament that so much of the field traces its roots to Berkeley,” said Dutta.

Berkeley EECS mourns the loss of Dave Hodges

EECS Prof. Emeritus and alumnus David A. Hodges (M.S. 1961; Ph.D. 1966) passed away on November 13th. He was 85. A former engineering dean and EECS department chair, Prof. Hodges began his career at Bell Telephone Laboratories before joining the EECS faculty in 1970 where his pioneering contributions to the design of integrated circuit (IC) chips and use of silicon-based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) technology challenged the conventional wisdom of the era. His landmark research led to the rapid development of devices, technologies, and standards that not only were instrumental to the growth of the semiconductor industry in Silicon Valley but continue to have a tremendous impact today. After 28 years of active service wherein he supervised 27 completed doctoral dissertations, 91 completed master's degrees, co-authored 3 books, 130 technical publications, and 6 patents, Prof. Hodges remained a stalwart of the department, mentoring and championing new faculty and shaping the department culture for decades to come. Prof. Hodges was a Fellow of the IEEE and a member of the NAE. He won the IEEE Education Medal (1997), the Berkeley Citation (1998), and was inducted into the Silicon Valley Hall of Fame (2013). A tremendous teacher, collaborator, colleague, and mentor, Prof. Hodges will be dearly missed.

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Ken Goldberg wins multiple best paper awards

CS and IEOR Prof. Ken Goldberg and his lab at BAIR have won multiple best paper awards this year. “Autonomously Untangling Long Cables” won the Best Systems Paper at the Robotics: Science and Systems (RSS) conference in June 2022. “Automated Pruning of Polyculture Plants” won Best Paper at the IEEE Conference on Automation Science and Engineering (CASE) in August 2022. At this year’s IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), held in October, the paper titled, “Speedfolding: Learning Efficient Bimanual Folding of Garments” took the top spot out of 3500 submissions to win the IROS Best Paper Award. The common thread among these results is the application of advances in deep learning to solve robot manipulation problems. “I feel lucky every day that I get to work in this uniquely stimulating environment with the world's most brilliant, creative, and dedicated students, staff, and faculty," said Goldberg.

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Joe Hellerstein wins IEEE VIS Test of Time Award

CS Prof. Joe Hellerstein has won the IEEE VIS Test of Time Award for a paper he co-wrote with Sean Kandel, Andreas Paepcke, and Jeffrey Heer in 2012 titled, “Enterprise Data Analysis and Visualization: An Interview Study.” The paper considered how visual analytics are used within organizations and provided an accessible framework for the abstraction of high-level tasks and user archetypes. “Before this work we struggled to find the vocabulary to use, now we have framings that are easy to remember and conceptualise the space nicely,” said the award committee. "The paper has received an impressive quantity of citations and patent citations, is still relevant today, and continues to be cited frequently." The IEEE VIS Test of Time Award recognizes articles published at previous conferences whose contents are still vibrant and useful today and have had a major impact and influence within and beyond the visualization community.  

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Edward Lee receives ACM SIGBED Technical Achievement Award and honorary doctorate from TU Wien

Edward Lee has won the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Special Interest Group on Embedded Systems (SIGBED) Technical Achievement Award. Prof. Lee is the inaugural recipient of the lifetime achievement award, and was honored “for foundational contributions on modeling and design of embedded, real-time, and cyber-physical systems.” Created in 2022, the Technical Achievement Award is designed “to recognize significant and sustained contributions to research and/or system implementations made by the awardee through the lifetime." Prof. Lee also received an honorary doctorate from the Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien) in May.

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Roxana Infante wins Wil Zeilinger Staff Excellence Award

Roxana Infante is the recipient of the 2022 EECS/ERSO Wil Zeilinger Staff Excellence Award. Established in 1992 in honor of Wil Zeilinger, Cory Hall’s first department engineer, the Zeilinger Award is the most prestigious staff honor in the EECS department and is presented annually to the staff member who best embodies "a spirit of service cheerfully given for the general good." Over the course of Roxana’s 12-year career at UC Berkeley, she has provided outstanding service to many 5-year research labs, including the ParLab, BerkeleyDrive, and the Berkeley Artificial Intelligence Research Lab (BAIR). According to one nominator, “She truly is one of the kindest, most cheerful, and thoughtful people I’ve ever met, let alone had the pleasure of working with.”

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Sophia Shao wins Intel Rising Star Award

EECS Assistant Prof. Sophia Shao is among the 15 recipients of the Intel Rising Star Award this year. Awarded annually, the Intel Rising Star Award (RSA) program supports early-career faculty whose research is groundbreaking and demonstrates the potential to disrupt industries. Recipients are chosen for “innovative teaching methods and for increasing the participation of women and underrepresented minorities in computer science and engineering.” Prof. Shao’s research focuses on improving the scalability, efficiency, and programmability of heterogeneous platforms from edge devices to data centers. In collaboration with senior technical leaders at Intel, Prof. Shao plans to explore the intersection of architectural prototyping, algorithm development, and programming support for heterogeneous accelerators: “As we enter the golden age of computer architecture, there are tremendous opportunities to innovate across the stack in the hardware community. I'm excited to work with our students, faculty members, and industry collaborators to build novel systems together!" said Shao.